17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddha, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, India, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Mahakala Tormas, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, torma photo, tormas, Uncategorized

34th Kagyu Monlam Torma-making

In February 2017 the Kagyu Monlam torma artists were creating their artworks. Enjoy the slideshow:

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Karmapa on the significance of the tormas created for the 26th Kagyu Monlam

Here is a video montage featuring excerpts of a talk by His Holiness, the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, in which he explained the significance of the tormas created for the 26th Kagyu Monlam (filmed in Bodhgaya, India in 2009). The text below is followed by a link to the transcript of the entire teaching: A Talk on the Relationship Between Masters and Disciples.

Excerpts from “A Talk on the Relationship Between Masters and Disciples:”

“We have expanded a number of the features of the site where we are holding the twenty-sixth Kagyu Monlam, including the main gates and so forth, and I thought it would be good to briefly point out what the tormas represent. The main decorative tormas are those with images of Marpa, Milarepa, and Gampopa on the right, and on the left, those with images of the forebears of the Nyingma school of the early translations, the glorious Sakya lineage, and the Gelukpa order.

The main principle these tormas illustrate is that when we consider the Tibetan Buddhist teachings, there are basically no lineages that are not mixed with the others. When the three Dharma kings Songsten Gampo, Trisong Deutsen, and Tri Ralpachen first established the Dharma in Tibet, the lineage that emerged at that time became known as the “Nyingma school of secret mantra.” Thus the Nyingma was Tibet’s first Buddhist lineage. Later on, during the reign of King Langdarma, the teachings were wiped out of Tibet, and the later propagation of the teachings began. That is the difference between the Nyingma and Sarma vajrayana schools.

Then the oral lineage of the Kadampa masters was passed down from the glorious Atisha, and the Sakya, Kagyu, and Geluk lineages successively appeared. The stages of the teachings of all of these lineages, along with their basic starting points, are the same. The different individual lineages arose out of different lineages of lamas and instructions, but fundamentally there is not even a single lineage that is not mixed with the others. In sum, all Tibetan lineages have been passed down intermingled with the others—all of them share Dharma connections and connections of samaya….”

“Therefore the presence of images of the root and lineage gurus from all of the Tibetan Buddhist lineages here today means that all Tibetan Buddhist lineages are nothing other than the teachings of the Buddha: They are all the same….”

For the entire teaching see link below:

A Talk on the Relationship between Masters and Disciples


17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Gelukpa, Gyudmed butter sculpture, Gyuto butter sculpture, H.H. Dalai Lama, India, Kalachakra, Kalachakra 2012, Kalachakra Butter Sculpture, Kalachakra tormas

A Dazzling Visual Feast of Butter Sculpture Celebrates the Kalachakra Teachings and Empowerment in Bodhgaya, India

The Tormas created for the Kalachakra are currently on display beneath the Bodhi Tree in Bodhgaya, India, January 2012
The Organizing Committee Banner for the 14th Dalai Lama's 32nd Kalachakra Initiation

The amazing butter sculptures displayed below were created by the Gyuto and Gyudmed monks for the Kalachakra teachings and initiation currently taking place in Bodhgaya. They depict the Seventeen Nalanda Masters: Nagarjuna, Aryadeva, Buddhapalita, Bhavaviveka, Chandrakirti, Shantideva, Shantarakshita, Kamalashila, Asanga, Vasubandhu, Dignaga, Dharmakirti, Arya Vimuktisena, Haribhadra, Gunaprabha, Shakyaprabha, and Atisha; Green Tara, White Tara, the Buddha Sakyamuni, Milarepa, the Dalai Lama, Tsongkhapa, and various other deities.

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Letter from Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche when Departing for Retreat

In early June, 2011, Mingyur Rinpoche left his monastery in Bodhgaya, India to begin a period of extended solitary retreat. He departed in the middle of the night without telling anyone. He did not take any money or belongings, just the clothes he was wearing. The day after he left, his close friend and attendant, Lama Soto, found this letter in Mingyur Rinpoches room.

via Tergar Meditation Community | Teachings & Resources | News & Newsletters | August, 2010 – Letter from Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche when Departing for Retreat.

17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, India, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Monlam Chenmo, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, Tibet, torma photo, tormas

Amchok Metok Gyens and the Nuns who Made Them

Amchok Metok is the name of a particularly beautiful decoration that looks like a flower and is used on the large butter sculptures that grace the shrine during the International Kagyu Monlam. Metok means flower and Amchok perhaps refers to the region of Tibet where this type of flower grew. In this clip, Tibetan Buddhist nun artists introduce themselves and demonstrate a few techniques as they prepare the flower gyens out of wax butter for the Kagyu Monlam shrine. Filmed by Ko Jung-Fa and Cynthia Chao in Bodhgaya, India in 2008-2009.

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The Gakyil gyen is similar to the Amchok Metok gyen. Gakyil means “joy swirl.” Below is a slideshow with more photos of both Amchok Metok and Gakyil.

 

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The Tormas and Other Offerings at the 28th Kagyu Monlam

A special report by Michele Martin

Check out a detailed and very interesting report on this year’s Kagyu Monlam Butter Sculptures by Michele Martin, complete with slide show, photos and diagrams. Enjoy!

http://www.kagyumonlam.org/english/news/Report/Report_20101223_Tormas.html