17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddha, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, India, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Mahakala Tormas, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, torma photo, tormas, Uncategorized

34th Kagyu Monlam Torma-making

In February 2017 the Kagyu Monlam torma artists were creating their artworks. Enjoy the slideshow:

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Buddhism, Film, India, Kagyu Lineage, Lama Dance, tormas

Tsechu film (Lama Dance at Ralang)

On 10th May, 2014 H.E. Goshir Gyaltsab Rinpoche presided over the
GARCHEN TSECHU CHENMO, (Sacred Ritual Lama Dance with full Costumes and Masks),
 with Tulkus, Lamas, Monks and Nuns from Densa Palchen Chosling Monastery performing. [Check out the torma at 3:47]

At Densa Palchen Chosling Monastery, Ralang, South Sikkim, India

 

 

17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddha, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Monlam Chenmo, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, tormas

Karmapa on the significance of the tormas created for the 26th Kagyu Monlam

Here is a video montage featuring excerpts of a talk by His Holiness, the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, in which he explained the significance of the tormas created for the 26th Kagyu Monlam (filmed in Bodhgaya, India in 2009). The text below is followed by a link to the transcript of the entire teaching: A Talk on the Relationship Between Masters and Disciples.

Excerpts from “A Talk on the Relationship Between Masters and Disciples:”

“We have expanded a number of the features of the site where we are holding the twenty-sixth Kagyu Monlam, including the main gates and so forth, and I thought it would be good to briefly point out what the tormas represent. The main decorative tormas are those with images of Marpa, Milarepa, and Gampopa on the right, and on the left, those with images of the forebears of the Nyingma school of the early translations, the glorious Sakya lineage, and the Gelukpa order.

The main principle these tormas illustrate is that when we consider the Tibetan Buddhist teachings, there are basically no lineages that are not mixed with the others. When the three Dharma kings Songsten Gampo, Trisong Deutsen, and Tri Ralpachen first established the Dharma in Tibet, the lineage that emerged at that time became known as the “Nyingma school of secret mantra.” Thus the Nyingma was Tibet’s first Buddhist lineage. Later on, during the reign of King Langdarma, the teachings were wiped out of Tibet, and the later propagation of the teachings began. That is the difference between the Nyingma and Sarma vajrayana schools.

Then the oral lineage of the Kadampa masters was passed down from the glorious Atisha, and the Sakya, Kagyu, and Geluk lineages successively appeared. The stages of the teachings of all of these lineages, along with their basic starting points, are the same. The different individual lineages arose out of different lineages of lamas and instructions, but fundamentally there is not even a single lineage that is not mixed with the others. In sum, all Tibetan lineages have been passed down intermingled with the others—all of them share Dharma connections and connections of samaya….”

“Therefore the presence of images of the root and lineage gurus from all of the Tibetan Buddhist lineages here today means that all Tibetan Buddhist lineages are nothing other than the teachings of the Buddha: They are all the same….”

For the entire teaching see link below:

A Talk on the Relationship between Masters and Disciples


17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, India, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Monlam Chenmo, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, Tibet, torma photo, tormas

Amchok Metok Gyens and the Nuns who Made Them

Amchok Metok is the name of a particularly beautiful decoration that looks like a flower and is used on the large butter sculptures that grace the shrine during the International Kagyu Monlam. Metok means flower and Amchok perhaps refers to the region of Tibet where this type of flower grew. In this clip, Tibetan Buddhist nun artists introduce themselves and demonstrate a few techniques as they prepare the flower gyens out of wax butter for the Kagyu Monlam shrine. Filmed by Ko Jung-Fa and Cynthia Chao in Bodhgaya, India in 2008-2009.

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The Gakyil gyen is similar to the Amchok Metok gyen. Gakyil means “joy swirl.” Below is a slideshow with more photos of both Amchok Metok and Gakyil.

 

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Buddha, Buddhism, Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche, Film

New film by Dzongsar Kyentse Rinpoche

Vara – preview of Jamyang Kyentse Rinpoche’s new film

from Bhutan Observer

February 8, 2011

Thimphu: Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche’s third feature film is set to be refreshingly different. Unlike his two previous films – The Cup and Travellers and Magicians – Vara, meaning blessing or boon in Sanskrit, will have a cast of professional actors, some of whom are well-known Bollywood actors.

Based on the novel Blood and Tears by the celebrated Indian poet and novelist, Sunil Gan-gopadhyay, the film will be in Hindi medium. Some of the potential lead actors include Imran Khan, Shahid Kapoor, Shahana Goswami, Mamatha Bhukya, and Padmapriya Janakiraman.

read more here….

17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddha, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, India, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Mahabodhi Stupa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, Tibet, torma photo, tormas

The 28th Kagyu Monlam Butter Sculptures

One of the Four Great Kings

From “An Interview with the Gyalwang Karmapa, November 29th, 2010” posted on the Kagyu Monlam website (www.kagyumonlam.org):

Q. What are the designs and themes of the butter sculptures this year?

This year they are in connection with the Karmapa 900 commemoration, thus in the torma [butter sculptures] we have representations of eight previous Karmapa incarnations, from the First Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa, to the Eighth Karmapa, Mikyö Dorje.

As last year, in the centre there are deeds of the Buddha, drawn from the Avadana [accounts of past life deeds]. Similarly, there are eight worldly protectors – the four great deities and the Four Great Kings –who guard the virtuous activities of Buddhist practitioners, and, more broadly, not just of Buddhist practitioners, but of other virtuous beings too. Since we are now living in India, in a sense this is a way of showing our respect to the Hindu gods of India, and since they are gods who protect all virtuous, positive beings, and since they were praised by Buddha as well, this is the reason for us to make torma of them in particular this year.

Here are some of our snapshots of this year’s Kagyu Monlam tormas:

One of the Four Great Kings
Sujata offering a bowl of yogurt to the Buddha
Diagram of the Karma Pakshi torma
A detail from the Karma Pakshi torma: "Taming Angulimala"
The Karma Pakshi Torma
The Buddha engaged in austerities
Vishnu, one of the four great Hindu deities
Detail of Vishnu
Detail of Vishnu
The Buddha descending from Tushita Heaven
Brahma, one of the four great Hindu deities
A monkey offers honey to the Buddha
The first Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa
Shrine Master, Ozer Nyingpo lighting incense
Jewels (norbus)
Flower ornament
Two of the offering tormas (called "shalzes")