17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddha, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, India, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Mahakala Tormas, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, torma photo, tormas, Uncategorized

34th Kagyu Monlam Torma-making

In February 2017 the Kagyu Monlam torma artists were creating their artworks. Enjoy the slideshow:

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17th Karmapa, Buddha, Buddhism, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, Tibet, vegetarianism

Vegetarian, Feminist Tibetan Monk Taking the US Ivy Leagues By Storm | Adele Wilde-Blavatsky

Karmapa Khyenno!

Twenty-nine year old Tibetan man, Orgyen Trinley Dorje – the 17th Karmapa – is currently on a two-month lecture tour of prestigious US universities, including Harvard, Princeton and Yale. Tickets for all events were immediately sold out. Who is this monk who, after visiting the headquarters of Google and Facebook, spoke about the need for a kinder internet culture? Why are so many people seeking his advice and inspiration in the 21st Century?

via Vegetarian, Feminist Tibetan Monk Taking the US Ivy Leagues By Storm | Adele Wilde-Blavatsky.

17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddha, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Monlam Chenmo, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, tormas

Karmapa on the significance of the tormas created for the 26th Kagyu Monlam

Here is a video montage featuring excerpts of a talk by His Holiness, the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, in which he explained the significance of the tormas created for the 26th Kagyu Monlam (filmed in Bodhgaya, India in 2009). The text below is followed by a link to the transcript of the entire teaching: A Talk on the Relationship Between Masters and Disciples.

Excerpts from “A Talk on the Relationship Between Masters and Disciples:”

“We have expanded a number of the features of the site where we are holding the twenty-sixth Kagyu Monlam, including the main gates and so forth, and I thought it would be good to briefly point out what the tormas represent. The main decorative tormas are those with images of Marpa, Milarepa, and Gampopa on the right, and on the left, those with images of the forebears of the Nyingma school of the early translations, the glorious Sakya lineage, and the Gelukpa order.

The main principle these tormas illustrate is that when we consider the Tibetan Buddhist teachings, there are basically no lineages that are not mixed with the others. When the three Dharma kings Songsten Gampo, Trisong Deutsen, and Tri Ralpachen first established the Dharma in Tibet, the lineage that emerged at that time became known as the “Nyingma school of secret mantra.” Thus the Nyingma was Tibet’s first Buddhist lineage. Later on, during the reign of King Langdarma, the teachings were wiped out of Tibet, and the later propagation of the teachings began. That is the difference between the Nyingma and Sarma vajrayana schools.

Then the oral lineage of the Kadampa masters was passed down from the glorious Atisha, and the Sakya, Kagyu, and Geluk lineages successively appeared. The stages of the teachings of all of these lineages, along with their basic starting points, are the same. The different individual lineages arose out of different lineages of lamas and instructions, but fundamentally there is not even a single lineage that is not mixed with the others. In sum, all Tibetan lineages have been passed down intermingled with the others—all of them share Dharma connections and connections of samaya….”

“Therefore the presence of images of the root and lineage gurus from all of the Tibetan Buddhist lineages here today means that all Tibetan Buddhist lineages are nothing other than the teachings of the Buddha: They are all the same….”

For the entire teaching see link below:

A Talk on the Relationship between Masters and Disciples


17th Karmapa, Kagyu Lineage, Ogyen Tinley Dorje

New Interview with His Holiness Karmapa by Claude Arpi

‘When Tibetans think of a place of refuge, they think of India’

via Exclusive! Interview with Karmapa Lama – Rediff.com News.

His Holiness, the 17th Karmapa with the interviewer Claude Arpi
17th Karmapa, India, Kagyu Lineage, meditation teaching, Ogyen Tinley Dorje

H.H. 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Teachings: “The Middling Stages of Meditation”

India Habitat Centre, New Delhi
22nd — 23rd April, 2011

The event was hosted by The Foundation for Universal Responsibility of His Holiness The Dalai Lama, a not for profit, non-sectarian, non-denominational organization established with the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to His Holiness in 1989. Gyalwang Karmapa taught for three sessions exploring themes from Acharya Kamalashila’s text The Middling Stages of Meditation, and answering general questions from the audience.

17th Karmapa, Buddhism, Kagyu Lineage, Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, Tibet

The Lives of the Karmapas: Teachings by Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche

Karmapa 900 Logo designed by the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje

THE LIVES OF THE KARMAPAS

“In honor of the Karmapa 900 celebration, Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche will be recounting the biographies of the Karmapas throughout the year. Beginning with Dusum Khyenpa, Rinpoche transmits his deep devotion for each of the Karmapa reincarnations as he describes the events of their lives and their remarkable achievements.”

via The Lives of the Karmapas: Teachings by Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche.

Listen to the teachings here:

http://www.karmapa900.org/audio/karmapa_kkr_namtars.html

17th Karmapa, Bodhgaya, Buddhism, Butter Sculpture, Film, India, Kagyu Lineage, Kagyu Monlam, Monlam Chenmo, Ogyen Tinley Dorje, Tibet, torma photo, tormas

Amchok Metok Gyens and the Nuns who Made Them

Amchok Metok is the name of a particularly beautiful decoration that looks like a flower and is used on the large butter sculptures that grace the shrine during the International Kagyu Monlam. Metok means flower and Amchok perhaps refers to the region of Tibet where this type of flower grew. In this clip, Tibetan Buddhist nun artists introduce themselves and demonstrate a few techniques as they prepare the flower gyens out of wax butter for the Kagyu Monlam shrine. Filmed by Ko Jung-Fa and Cynthia Chao in Bodhgaya, India in 2008-2009.

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The Gakyil gyen is similar to the Amchok Metok gyen. Gakyil means “joy swirl.” Below is a slideshow with more photos of both Amchok Metok and Gakyil.

 

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